The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has extended its flexibility regarding the physical presence requirements for I-9 inspection for another 30 days, until August 19, due to the ongoing precautions related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Eligible employers may continue to inspect Section 2 documents remotely (e.g., over video link, fax, or email) and must

Foreign nationals with approved permanent residence applications but no actual permanent resident card (known as Green Cards) are not the only ones dealing with the printing back-up at USCIS. After deciding to bring the printing of Green Cards and all other employment authorization documents in-house, USCIS is not able to keep up with the

The Department of Homeland Security’s COVID-19 flexibility regarding the physical presence requirements for I-9 inspection ends on July 19, 2020, for companies that are still operating 100-percent remotely. Unless further extended, the three-day rule to review the original documents in person will kick in on that date. But that three-day clock may start ticking

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) once again is extending its flexibility regarding the physical presence requirements for I-9 inspection for another 30 days until July 19, 2020, due to the ongoing precautions related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Eligible employers may continue to inspect Section 2 documents remotely (e.g., over video link, fax,

As businesses begin to reopen after shutdowns to help stop the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, employers should anticipate heightened scrutiny by USCIS, ICE, and the Departments of Labor and Justice regarding wage and hour and immigration requirements.

The current surge in worksite enforcement is expected to result in as many as 10,000 I-9 audits

ICE has announced that its flexibility regarding the physical presence requirements for I-9 inspection will be extended for another 30 days, until June 18, 2020 due to continued COVID-19 precautions. The terms and details of this flexibility remain the same.

Basically, eligible employers may continue to inspect Section 2 documents remotely (e.g., over video

The persistent problem of undocumented workers presenting plausible (but ultimately fraudulent) employment verification documents to employers has taken a new twist in the COVID-19 pandemic: a rise in imposter claims for unemployment insurance.

Imposter claims are a type of identity theft; someone uses someone else’s personal information, including Social Security numbers, to collect unemployment compensation.

The updated M-274, Handbook for Employers: Guidance for Completing Form I-9, from USCIS offers some interesting substantive clarifications and developments.

Changes to match the most recent Form I-9 revisions include:

  1. Section 2.0 clarifies that any person can serve as an authorized representative of the employer to complete, update, or make corrections to Section 2

E-Verify has modified its policies temporarily due to COVID-19 as follows:

  • Employers must still create cases in E-Verify within three business days from the date of hire.
  • Employers should use the hire date from the employee’s Form I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification.
  • Delays in E-Verify case creations are documented in the usual way by selecting