Consistent with the Biden Administration’s extensions for other countries, the Department of Homeland Security announced an 18-month extension and redesignation of Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for both Sudan and South Sudan due to conditions in those countries that temporarily prevent their nationals from returning safely.

The specifics for South Sudan are published in the Federal

Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has announced the designation of Ukraine for Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for 18 months.

This designation was made based on the ongoing armed conflict and extraordinary and temporary conditions in Ukraine that prevent Ukrainian nationals, and those of no nationality who last habitually resided in Ukraine, from returning to Ukraine

In December 2021, Congressional Democrats tried to include immigration reforms in the Build Back Better Act (BBBA). Some of the proposals would have helped unauthorized immigrants by providing those eligible with parole and work authorization. The bill also would have reduced green card backlogs and provided some applicants with expedited green cards for a fee.

As of January 31, 2022, spouses entering the United States in L-2 or E status may be able to obtain work authorization at the border by asking Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to give them a “spousal” designation in their I-94 record. Because USCIS has not issued “official” guidance on this yet, requesting the designation

The onset and persistence of the COVID-19 pandemic has only exacerbated the shortage of healthcare workers in the United States, especially in rural areas. Periodic spikes in infection levels has sped burn-out among healthcare workers. There are many foreign nationals who can and do fill these healthcare roles including those in Temporary Protected Status (TPS)

For early-stage tech employers, rapid business growth can quickly lead to costly employment and immigration law missteps. Risks can be magnified when striving to attract talent. Please listen to the robust and enlightening discussion among Jackson Lewis immigration attorneys Zain Abidi and Benjamin Lau, together with Jackson Lewis employment attorney Doug Klein, here.

The City Council of New York City unanimously passed legislation giving non-U.S. citizens the right to vote in local elections starting on January 9, 2023.

The bill grants this local franchise to 800,000 non-citizens if they are Permanent Residents or have work authorization and have been in residence in the City for at least 30

Senate Parliamentarian Elizabeth MacDonough has ruled for a third time that specific immigration provisions in the Build Back Better Act (BBBA) granting parole and work authorization to unauthorized aliens who entered the United States before January 1, 2011, cannot be included in the reconciliation bill because the policy changes outweigh the budgetary impact.

Unless Senate

ICE has announced it will extend I-9 flexibility until April 30, 2022, due to continuing precautions related to COVID-19.

The guidance remains the same:

  • Employees who work exclusively in a remote setting due to COVID-19 continue to be temporarily exempt from the in-person requirements associated with Form I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification, until they start working

Nonimmigrant spouses of H-1B and L-1 visa holders with long-pending EAD applications have finally received some relief. Based upon a settlement in Shergill v. Mayokas, USCIS is making major policy changes. Going forward, certain H-4 spouses with pending EAD applications will be entitled to 180-day automatic extensions of their EAD cards and L-2